About that time my kid ate off the floor

image

There are parenting moments that you’re not about to scrapbook. These are times that you are not terribly proud of…times when you’re not sure if you’re making the right call. Meal-time battles can sometimes get ugly as of late, especially with my three year old.

Take today, for instance, when after refusing to eat his pork chop and veggies, he dumped his entire plate on the floor! I took him to his room for a time-out with much protesting. After five minutes, he had settled down and chirped, “sorry Mom.”

I just said, “Well, eat your lunch.” And he did eat some – off the floor! During the long process of eating, he tried crawling on my lap, saying those magical words, “I love you Mommy.” And “I like your scarf, but not the white part.” Little stinker! After eating some, I got out the broom and dust pan for him to clean up the rest.

Sigh…life with a three year old!!

Age Two – Take Two

Now that Daddy O. and I are in the throes of age two for the second time around (thus Age Two – Take Two), we can’t help but feel it’s a little easier. Some possible explanations:

  • Maybe we’ve honed our parenting skills for the toddler years, remembering what worked well for big sister’s two-year-old antics.
  • Maybe we’re just a little more laid-back this time around.
  • Maybe God has answered my prayers for patience.
  • Most likely it’s a combination of all of the above.

It’s true that little brother is different than big sister in many ways.  He’s much more talkative, a little more easy-going, more physical in terms of biting and hitting, and is definitely into trains, cars, and balls. Big sister is more than happy to tattle on him whenever he breaks a rule.  She is very black and white and likes things to go HER way when she plays with little brother, though they can be so sweet together (see my post One Thing that Surprised Me Most as a Mom for more about the brother-sister relationship). During moments of conflict, I tend to give them space to see if they’ll figure it out on their own, but intervene when I hear screaming and crying.

Big Sister and Little Brother Age 2

My Two Year Old Cutie-pies (and 4 Year Old Big Sister). I think they are pretending to be kitties. 

Just like his sister (and parents), Little Brother is prone to stubbornness. This trait can lead to monumental tantrums – especially during times of conflict as we have learned!  A few ways that we try to stop tantrums that seem to work:

  • Distraction.  While little brother cried & screamed on a car ride over the holidays, I quick yelled, “Look – Christmas lights out your side (of the car).” The shiny Christmas cheer magically quieted him down.
  • Food Bribe. Little brother and I were having a standoff at the grocery store.  All of our gear and big sister were loaded into a shopping card already.  He didn’t WANT to go in THAT cart.  I didn’t want to reload everything in HIS chosen cart.  We waited. He screamed. We waited some more.  I checked in with him to see if he was ready to join us, and he screamed some more.  I waited more. Finally, I offered him a granola bar that he could eat if he rode in Mom’s cart.  He finally agreed. Another kind mom came up to me, having witness this all unfold, and complimented me on how I handled the situation.  It was really kind of her! Don’t we ALL hate tantrums in public?!
  • Asking questions. After some crying and screaming, I’ll calmly ask little brother, “What do you want?  I can’t understand you right now. Can you use words?” This can typically help.
  • Get favorite blankie & paci.  We find his favorite blanket and pacifier to help him calm down.  At two and a half, he doesn’t use his paci THAT much (mostly at night), but it still gives him comfort. Our dentist and pediatrician have encouraged us to simply let him give it up when he’s ready, so for now the pacifier and favorite blanket bring some peace and quiet to the raging two-year-old.
  • Time and space.  Sometimes you just have to let it out! Little brother has been wanting to hear the end of songs when we drive home, which means sitting in the car.  Sometimes, I oblige and let him listen until the song is over.  One day with below zero temperatures, it wasn’t going to happen, so I carried him unwillingly inside. I gave him time to cry & scream by himself, and in a few minutes he was ready to return to calmness and fun.

I’m curious to see how we continue to navigate Little Brother’s second year.  As is common with kids, just when you think you have things figured out, things can change! How do you cope with the terrible twos and tantrums?

In the spirit of #ThrowbackThursday, here are some older posts I wrote about parenting:

Have a great day and almost TGIF!

A First: Mom Put in “Time Out!”

It’s true.

I was given a “time out” by my pre-schooler last night.  I can’t sneak anything by her anymore! Geez!

Daddy O. was commenting on the chaos I created in the kitchen in order to lovingly prepare a pasta salad with olives, carrots, cheese & salami.  He was the one to clean it up, so I asked him if he would have preferred not to have such a delicious pasta salad. As I made that comment, I innocently gave him a swat on the tush.

My daughter had clear sight of my butt-smack, and almost instantly said, “Mom, no hitting. You get a time-out.”

Daddy O., enjoying this a little too much, said, “Okay Mama, it’s one minute for each year old you are.”

I replied, “Can I please have 30-some minutes of time to myself?  Can I bring a book?”  Can you say paradise?!

We compromised, and I was given a two-minute time-out in the corner.  Daddy O. and big sister seemed to savor watching me as I served time as a consequence for choosing to hit.

Finally the oven timer buzz, and I was allowed out of time-out.  I then gave Daddy O. a hug and a smooch, and told him I was sorry.  I will try to make better decisions next time (or at least wait until the kids are in bed to deliver butt-smacks).

Have you been put in time-out by your kids?  I’d love to hear about it!